Monday, June 29, 2015

Confessions from the Editing Cave with Melody Winter

Welcome back to yet another installment of Confessions from the Editing Cave. Today in the confessional -- new adult author, Melody Winter!




1. Tell us a bit about your background working with editor(s). Did you hire a freelance editor? Work with an editor at a publishing house? Work with an agent in the capacity of an editor? All of the above or some other combination?
Before I signed with REUTS publications I was given some feedback and suggested structural edits to consider by their Senior Editor. When I read through her notes I knew that even if I didn’t sign with them I would be looking at the suggestions she made. She understood all the sub-plots, connected with the characters and her genuine excitement about the book was a major decision in why I chose to sign with REUTS.

2. What was your overall relationship with your editor? Good? Bad? Indifferent?
Really good. She was always available for advice when I needed it with the structural edits, and the line edits were undertaken with a helping hand rather than a ‘do this’ attitude. She really worked WITH me, and I cannot stress how important this proved to be.

3. What was the best edit you’ve ever received from your editor?
It was a structural edit. Make the timeline longer between their first meeting and them falling for each other. Make him work for her love, make us want to believe him.

4. What was the worst edit you’ve ever received from your editor?
I don’t think I’ve ever received a bad edit. There were only a few points that we disagreed on, but I wouldn’t call them bad edits. The main areas we disagreed was on the American/British different use of the language. We usually solved this by agreeing on a completely different word of rewriting the sentence.

5. What was your first, initial, gut-reaction to your edits?
A nod of the head, and a ‘oh, my gosh, she’s so got this, she’s right.”

6. Confession time! Share anything else you’d like to confess.
I secretly stalked my editor for quite a while before I submitted. The more I spoke to her while waiting for my submission to be read, the more I knew she was the person I wanted to work with. I’m beyond happy that she’s working with me on the rest of the series.


ALL ABOUT MELODY:


Growing up, Melody Winter showed a natural ability in art, a head for maths, and a tendency to write far too long English essays. Difficult to place in the world when she graduated, she pursued a career in teaching, but eventually ended up working in Finance. Melody is convinced the methodical time she spends working with numbers fuels her desire to drift into dream worlds and write about the illusory characters in her head.
Melody Winter lives in North Yorkshire, England, with her husband and two sons. When not dealing with football, rugby, and a whole plethora of ‘boy’ activities, she will be found scribbling notes for her stories, or preparing for another trip to the beach. With an obsession for anything mythical, Melody revels in reading and writing about such creatures
Sachael Dreams is her debut novel, and the first in her New Adult Romantic Fantasy series—the ‘Mine Series’.

To connect with Melody, visit her on her websiteFacebook, and Twitter.

Monday, June 22, 2015

Confessions from the Editing Cave with Suzanne VanRooyen

Welcome back to yet another installment of Confessions from the Editing Cave. Today in the confessional -- young adult author, Suzanne van Rooyen!




1. Tell us a bit about your background working with editor(s). Did you hire a freelance editor? Work with an editor at a publishing house? Work with an agent in the capacity of an editor? All of the above or some other combination?
I am extremely lucky to have an editorial agent – the lovely Jordy Albert. What this means is that, when I submit a new work to my agent, she reads it and gives me detailed editing feedback on content. This level of editing doesn't look at line for line grammar, word echoes etc. but rather at the big picture. Will a reader connect with my characters? Is there a gaping plot hole? Does the story work?  My agent also makes suggestions based on her knowledge of what's selling and what might not work for the editors she has in mind for the work. It's only after revisions – which might go more than one round depending on how many changes are required – that we go on submission. Since I've had an editorial agent, I've found the number of first round edits from my publisher to be greatly reduced so Jordy clearly knows her stuff.


As a traditionally published author only working with the in-house editors of my publishers, I've never hired a freelance editor. As of writing this, I have worked with four different editors at four different publishing houses, some more awesome than others.

2. What was your overall relationship with your editor? Good? Bad? Indifferent?
In general, very good. Working with an editor can be tricky because there are so many things that are subjective. Perhaps I've just been lucky, but I have always had editors who are willing to discuss and compromise on proposed changes. Likewise, as an author you have to be willing to compromise as well and know when to pick your battles. Sometimes you really do need to kill your darlings in order to tighten up the narrative. I have been extremely lucky to work with editors who understood my vision for the story and who loved my story.

3. What was the best edit you’ve ever received from your editor?
Wow, tricky question. In one work I had used some pretty awful google translated Spanish, which thankfully my editor could correct (that was embarrassing! And an experience I have definitely learned from.) Jordy has also provided some excellent edits, helping me explore the emotional landscapes of my characters a lot more. Honestly, the best edits are the ones that make me go, 'damn, why didn't I see that?' and that with one simple change can make a previously dull sentence sparkle, can make a scene pack a punch, or elevate a character to greater heights.

4. What was the worst edit you’ve ever received from your editor?
Perhaps those that I felt were trying too hard to rewrite my story. I haven't received many of these, perhaps a couple of sentence suggestions at most, where I felt the suggested changes didn't suit my voice or character, but that's really minor.

5. What was your first, initial, gut-reaction to your edits?
I'm always nervous when I open up an editorial letter. It's hard to get past the thought that you're about to read a list of what you did wrong, when really it's a list of how to take the manuscript from good or great to incredible! I really thought I'd be devastated the first time I opened up an editorial letter, angry, defensive, insulted even, but I wasn't – I was excited! Since then, I've tried to view edits as an opportunity rather than a rap over the knuckles. It's not about fixing mistakes (well, sometimes) but rather about polishing the story until it shines. These days, I love edits and look forward to process – just as soon as I pluck up the courage to open the editorial letter ;)

6. Confession time! Share anything else you’d like to confess.
There are times when I find I don't agree with a suggestion and add a comment saying as much, only to come back to the same spot an hour, a day or even a week later and reluctantly admit that the editor was right. 


ALL ABOUT SUZANNE:

Suzanne is a tattooed storyteller from South Africa. She currently lives in Sweden and is busy making friends with the ghosts of her Viking ancestors. Although she has a Master’s degree in music, Suzanne prefers conjuring strange worlds and creating quirky characters. When she grows up, she wants to be an elf – until then, she spends her time (when not writing) wall climbing, buying far too many books, and entertaining her shiba inu, Lego. Her books include The Other Me and I Heart Robot.

To connect with Suzanne, visit her on her websiteFacebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

Wednesday, June 17, 2015

{Cover Reveal}: Out of Character

Today is the cover reveal for Out of Character by Molly Zenk. This cover reveal is organized by Lola's Blog Tours.



Out of Character


Blurb:

After the loss of her brother, actress Harmony Jones struggles with daily life. Landing the lead role on the hit faith based living history show, 1700s Life, might be the perfect way to reconnect with her faith and be her big acting break.

Tired of hiding his strong faith and convictions to get secular roles, David Hawkins jumps at the chance to play the curate on 1700s Life. It's the perfect vehicle to spread God’s word.

Elliot Banes’ career needs an image makeover, so he accepts the naval hero role on 1700s Life. Getting away from his overbearing mother is an added bonus. His true hope is to learn to speak his mind instead of always fading into the background.

When a scripted love triangle between Harmony, David, and Elliot becomes a real life love triangle, Harmony must make a difficult decision. She hoped to find her wavering faith, she didn't count on finding love as well. If that was her only obstacle, the role would be a breeze. Unfortunately, there’s an on-set spy intent on causing drama. Can Harmony see through all the lies and secrets to the truth in her heart, or will she end up falling for the wrong man?




Molly ZenkAbout the Author:

Molly Zenk was born in Minnesota, grew up in Florida, lived briefly in Tennessee before finally settling in Colorado. She graduated from Flagler College in St. Augustine, FL with degrees in Secondary Education, English, and Creative Writing. She is married to a Mathmatician/Software Engineer who complains about there not being enough "math" or info about him in her author bio. They live in Arvada, CO with their young daughters, 1 dog, and 1 cat.



You can find and contact Molly here:

- Website

- Facebook

- Twitter

- Goodreads

- Amazon



Monday, June 15, 2015

Confessions from the Editing Cave with Rachel Brimble

Welcome back to yet another installment of Confessions from the Editing Cave. Today in the confessional -- adult romance author, Rachel Brimble!




1. Tell us a bit about your background working with editor(s). Did you hire a freelance editor? Work with an editor at a publishing house? Work with an agent in the capacity of an editor? All of the above or some other combination?
My first novel was published in 2007 and fourteen books later, I have worked with a total of eight editors. I can honestly say each and every one taught me something positive with my writing and/or career path. I have wanted to be an author for a long time and look at each of my experiences with editors as a learning curve. To my mind, an editor is there to make your book better – not to rip you or your book down.

2. What was your overall relationship with your editor? Good? Bad? Indifferent?
I am lucky enough to have had good relationships with all my editors – I think the reason for that is I always approach the editing process with an open mind. I listen to my editors’ suggestions and advice and don’t treat my books as my property that no one else can have an opinion on. If I agree with the comments, I act accordingly. If I don’t, I discuss it with my editor until we come to a compromise that suits us both. This is a business relationship and it’s important for an author to treat it as such. 

3. What was the best edit you’ve ever received from your editor?
Ha! This is hard because all my edits have had trials of some sort or another and I am yet to have a manuscript come back with no edits at all. That would be the best one! I am lucky that my two current editors, with whom I have worked on eight books in total, really understand me and my work.

4. What was the worst edit you’ve ever received from your editor?
The worst was probably with my first book, but that was down to my inexperience rather than my poor editor. She was very patient, thoughtful and encouraging. I have been very blessed!

5. What was your first, initial, gut-reaction to your edits?
My first reaction to every set of edits is…Oh. My. God! Every time, I wonder how I got through them the last time. When you have an 85,000 word manuscript come back to you with comments and suggestions throughout, it can be overwhelming. The only way I find to tackle it is to take one comment at a time and deal with it. Don’t look at the whole picture or you will cry…trust me!

6. Confession time! Share anything else you’d like to confess.
If I’m honest, I enjoy the editing process. I would have usually have had a couple of months since I saw the manuscript and can’t wait to read what my editor thought of it, their reaction to the characters and the areas of improvement or areas they think can be cut. Editing is a huge part of the writing process, if I didn’t enjoy it, I wouldn’t write. Simple.


ALL ABOUT RACHEL:


Rachel lives with her husband and two teenage daughters in a small town near Bath in the UK. After having several novels published by small US presses, she secured agent representation in 2011. In 2012, she sold two books to Harlequin Superromance and a further three in 2013. She also writes Victorian romance for Kensington--her debut was released in April 2013, followed by a second in January 2014 and the third is released Jan 2015.

Rachel is a member of the Romantic Novelists Association and Romance Writers of America, and was selected to mentor the Superromance finalist of So You Think You Can Write 2014 contest. When she isn’t writing, you’ll find Rachel with her head in a book or walking the beautiful English countryside with her family. Her dream place to live is Bourton-on-the-Water in South West England.

She likes nothing more than connecting and chatting with her readers and fellow romance writers. Rachel would love to hear from you!

To connect with Rachel, visit her on her website, blogFacebook, and Twitter.

Monday, June 8, 2015

Learning from the Past to Embrace the Future

Two years ago on this very day, my young adult romance, The Georgia Corbins, was released to the world, courtesy of Entranced Publishing. Unfortunately, its time on the virtual shelves was short lived because a short five months later, my publisher was in trouble and sinking faster than the Titanic. I prayed long and hard that it was nothing more than growing pains; that, like many new publishers, it just needed to find its footing in this competitive, ever-changing market. Alas, that wasn't the case. Four months after I requested and was given my rights back, the publisher officially closed its doors for good. 

Me and the authors were all like....


I was devastated. 

So, we did the only thing we could think of at the time: We banded together on Facebook, offered encouragement and support to one another as we struggled with the most important question of all: What do we do now??

I can't begin to tell you the myriad of emotions I experienced, but above all, I was heartbroken. All authors have that one book that is so close to their heart, that one book they can't seem to let go of no matter what happens. Yeah, The Georgia Corbins is that book for me. I was lost and very un-trusting of all publishers, but I knew if I ever wanted this book to see the light of day again, I had to pick myself up and move on. 


That's been a lot easier said than done. 

See, there's this thing in publishing known as first publication rights, which are like the Holy Grail in this business, and the first time a book is published, that right essentially vanishes. So when you have a book, like I did, that was briefly published, it then becomes known as "previously published." To most, this doesn't seem like a big deal. But it is. It's a HUGE deal, actually, because a lot of agents and publishers won't rep or publish a book that's already been published. Catch where I'm going with this?

As a result of that and my now skeptical and distrustful view of many small publishers, this book has sat in my laptop, untouched, for two years. It was only within the last month that I began sending it out again. And guess what??

I have TWO offers of publication! I was all like....



But then, when it came time to put pen to paper and sign on the dotted line, I was like...



I took a very large step back and really scrutinized these offers and these publishers. Yes, I really want this book to be published again. Way more than I can express in words. But the Entranced debacle taught me a LOT about this industry. 

The most important lesson being: Trust your instincts!

And that's exactly what I'm doing. While both of these publishers are reputable (as far as I can tell) and have been nothing but nice and professional, presenting me with extremely fair offers that would have given me simultaneous digital and print release, I know in my heart that no one will be able to handle this story with as much care and passion as I can. To them, this is a business, a means to earn profits. And yes, it is for me, too, but it's so much more than that. It's my passion, my desire, my life's ambition. I hope, one day, readers will have as much love and enthusiasm for these characters as I do, but until then, I know I'm the best person to bring this story back out into the world. 

So, I have declined both of the offers in favor of embracing the Indie lifestyle. 



That's right. I'm going to self publish this series, and I am beyond excited to embark on this journey. I have a fantastic team in place to help me with editing, cover art, and formatting. And the support of fellow Indie authors has been overwhelming. 

And lemme tell you.... I have got some AWESOME things planned for y'all! Free books. Never before released scenes. Brand new characters. A whole new ending :) A FOURTH BOOK! 

Excited yet?? Want to stay up to date on all the fun things I've got happening? Then please, please sign up for my newsletter. I promise I won't spam you, but you will get a free book just for signing up! 

(This is me begging.)

Also, because I'm in an giving mood, check out this GIVEAWAY! You could win a $25 Amazon gift card. 




Confessions from the Editing Cave with Reagan Phillips

Welcome back to yet another installment of Confessions from the Editing Cave. Today in the confessional -- romantic suspense author, Reagan Phillips!




1. Tell us a bit about your background working with editor(s). Did you hire a freelance editor? Work with an editor at a publishing house? Work with an agent in the capacity of an editor? All of the above or some other combination?
My experience with editors is a bit of a mixed bag. I started with an editor for a small press publisher who happened to also be the owner and most prolific writer for that publisher. I was very new to writing and thought my lack of developmental feedback was a sign of my writing brilliance. Thank goodness I learned that a good editor doesn’t spew rainbows and unicorn poop all over your work but rather runs the red pen dry to make your writing the best it possibly can be while keeping your voice and style intact. No, I don’t envy editors. Their job is super hard!

2. What was your overall relationship with your editor? Good? Bad? Indifferent?
My relationship with each of the editors I’ve worked with has always been good, even when the edits weren’t so much :)  I truly believe building relationships with the team that builds your book is one of the most important parts of our jobs as writers. And I’m happy to say my current freelance editor is a dream come true. She’s hard when she needs to be but doesn’t hold back on the kudos and I love, love, love the ideas she has to strengthen my writing while keeping it my writing. 

3. What was the best edit you’ve ever received from your editor?
I’m not sure if I can point out just one thing to be the best edits I’ve ever received, but I’d have to say on the whole the edits that point out flaws I as the author can’t see for being so close to the story are the most helpful. I had an editor point out one of my characters acted like a total immature brat at the beginning of the book and even though she grows into a strong woman, it still didn’t work for her. That tidbit of advice changed my whole character arc into something much stronger.

4. What was the worst edit you’ve ever received from your editor?
Worst edits…I feel like I’m on the hot seat now. I’d have to say the worst edits I ever got were….well…okay, I don’t think I’ve ever had truly bad edits. Even if the suggestions didn’t fit what I wanted with my story, I still found them to be helpful in making me prove why I’d chosen to do whatever the editor wanted me to change. Call me Pollyanna, but even bad edits can strengthen a writer if that writer is willing to use them as a learning tool.

5. What was your first, initial, gut-reaction to your edits?
I have a system with edits. My first reaction is to always proclaim to anyone who will listen that I have decided to quit writing and return to the day job. Working an eight to five has to be easier than fixing all those mistakes, right? I make it a point to read over edits then close the document and not look at it again for at least a day or two. After a few days my thoughts shift from fear to determination and I’m ready to tackle the changes that will make my story more enjoyable to readers. 

6. Confession time! Share anything else you’d like to confess.
True Confessions? My Favorite game. Let’s see…what to tell…okay, this is a good one. My first book went to print without the proof edits complete. The editor for the publisher loaded the wrong file (or so the story goes). My first published book, my baby, my one perfect thing, still had the hundred and two errors I’d pointed out in the galleys. No, it wasn’t the end of the world, but it sure felt like it. A little hard work and backtracking and the mistakes were fixed but for a few days I didn’t think I would ever publish a book again. A good editor is worth their weight in gold. A great editor is worth more than money can buy. 


ALL ABOUT REAGAN:
Steamy romantic suspense writer, Reagan Phillips lives in the Southern United States with her college sweetheart, The Officer, their son, one overactive beagle, and an adored fish. 

Reagan is a 2013 Beacon Award Winner for erotic romance for her debut title, Confess.
Connect with Reagan on her websiteFacebook, and Twitter

Tuesday, June 2, 2015

TEASER TUESDAY: Susanne Matthews

Welcome to another installment of TEASER TUESDAY. I'm excited to have the lovely Susanne Matthews here with us today. She'll be sharing an excerpt from her romantic suspense, ALL FOR LOVE


~~~~~~~~~~~

EXCLUSIVE EXCERPT:
The elevator lurched again, dragging her back. With each stop, the number of people in the elevator decreased, and she began to feel less confined. By the time they reached the sixth floor, there were only two people left—herself and a man. She’d started when he’d brushed against her earlier, but she hadn’t seen his face. Now, she looked up into hazel eyes staring at her as if she were the number one item on the dessert menu. She was waiting for him to lick his chops.

Normally, she’d ignore the man, but there was something about the way he was looking at her that both annoyed her and warmed her inside. He resembled the imaginary boyfriend she’d created to appease her parents and that increased her discomfort.

Get a grip, Livy.

No man had ever affected her this way—why him? Why now? Did he really look like her ideal man? Maybe, just a little around the eyes, but he was making her feel like a specimen on a microscope slide, and she resented it.

“Is there some reason why you’re staring at me like that?” She was exasperated by his perceived rudeness.

He chuckled, and Olivia’s heart jumped into her throat. The sound of his laughter was pleasant and eerily familiar.

His hazel eyes twinkled. “Is there a law in America against admiring an attractive woman?”

British. His voice sent goose bumps racing further along her flesh, annoying her. The heavy accent was similar to her father’s but far more pronounced. His appreciative gaze raked her up and down, and she felt heat rise in her cheeks. She despised her fair skin and its tendency to blush. Why did this man attract her when she’d sworn never to get involved with any man again? Seeing her nephew must have reset her biological clock. So much for having it under control.

She’d never thought a man could be beautiful, but this one was. He stared at her from behind black-framed glasses, and his full beard and mustache were as neatly trimmed as his hair, reminding her of Ben Affleck, one of her favorite actors.

“Admiring is one thing, leering is another,” she said sharper than she’d intended. His actions discomforted her.

He grinned, and her stomach flip-flopped.

“TouchĂ©. My apologies, but I can’t be the first man who’s ever stared at you. I’ve seen many stunning women in my life, but none with hair like yours. It’s alive, on fire.”

Olivia frowned. He was hard to understand, but she knew he was talking about her hair, a sore spot with her, and knowing it was the reason for his behavior added insult to injury. She was about to say something when she caught sight of herself in the mirrored wall and winced.

No wonder he’s staring at me.


~~~~~~~~~~~


BLURB:
To overcome your fear, you must first face it.

Someone is out to destroy Greg Simmons and everyone he has ever loved. After an accident leaves his teenage daughter depressed and distraught, Greg will do anything to make her happy again.
Olivia Marshall lost both her fiancé and her cousin in a deadly avalanche. She has vowed never to set foot on a ski hill again. But now, working as a bodyguard with Anderson Security, Olivia must face her greatest fears to save Greg and his daughter.


Something about Olivia’s determination strikes a chord in Greg, but will she be the salvation he needs, or will he be her destruction?



BUY LINKS: 
AMAZON B&N / KOBO SMASHWORDS 


ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
Susanne Matthews grew up as an avid reader of all types of books, but always with a penchant for happily ever after romances. In her imagination, she travelled to foreign lands, past and present, and soared into the future. Today, she has made her dreams come true. A retired educator, she now gets to spend her time writing, so she can share her adventures with her readers. She loves the ins and outs of romance, and the complex journey it takes to get from the first word to the last period of a novel. As she writes, her characters take on a life of their own, and she shares their fears and agonies on the road to self-discovery and love.


Susanne lives in Cornwall, Ontario with her husband. She has three adult children and five grandchildren. When she isn’t writing, she enjoys reading, chatting on the Internet with her writer friends, and hearing from her readers.

Connect with Susanne on her websiteTwitterFacebook, and Google+


Don't forget to check out the tour wide giveaway!

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Monday, June 1, 2015

Confessions from the Editing Cave with MJ Compton

Welcome back to yet another installment of Confessions from the Editing Cave. Today in the confessional -- paranormal romance author, MJ Compton!




1. Tell us a bit about your background working with editor(s). Did you hire a freelance editor? Work with an editor at a publishing house? Work with an agent in the capacity of an editor? All of the above or some other combination?
I have worked as a copyeditor for a small publishing house; as an author, I’ve worked with multiple editors at two small publishing houses, and I once had an agent who liked to edit my work.

2. What was your overall relationship with your editor? Good? Bad? Indifferent?
With my initial publishing house, I don’t have direct contact with the people editing my books. With my second publisher, I have one editor, and we interact a lot. I think every editor I’ve had asked fabulous questions that would only strengthen my book.  Sometimes, I do worry about “voice” vs. editing, but have always been able to find a way to make it work.

3. What was the best edit you’ve ever received from your editor?
That’s really difficult to say.  Possibly making a scene less of an “almost-rape” scene. It wasn’t a rape scene, but without making the hero’s motivations a whole heck of a lot clearer, it came across pretty nasty. (And yes, he stopped once he realized what he was doing.)

4. What was the worst edit you’ve ever received from your editor?
Two different editors, two different books, two punctuation issues. The first one tried to change all of my plurals to possessives.  The second one tried to change all of my colons to commas.  (Third editor, third book: “I don’t usually like semi-colons in fiction, but you did use it correctly.”)

5. What was your first, initial, gut-reaction to your edits?
“Wow! I thought this was cleaner,” technically speaking. And I’ve been told my manuscripts are really clean (free of typos, formatting issues, etc.) Other than that, I usually think: “Good catch!” or “Great question! I’d better clarify that.”  My editors are trying to make my story the best book it can be. Arguing with them or disregarding their questions and concerns isn’t professional. We all want the books to sell a lot of copies.

6. Confession time! Share anything else you’d like to confess.
When I work as a copy editor, I am shocked at the sloppiness of some manuscripts. When submitting to a publisher, the manuscript should be as clean and polished as you can make it. I was on a panel of editors last year where we shared our pet peeves.  Poor presentation was in the top three. “The copy editor will fix it,” mentality should have died several decades ago. Be professional.


ALL ABOUT MJ:


MJ Compton grew up near Cardiff, New York, a place best known for its giant.

Although her 30-year career in local television included such highlights as being bitten by a lion, preempting a US President for a college basketball game, giving a three-time world champion boxer a few black eyes, a mention in the Drudge Report, and meeting her husband, MJ’s urge to create her own stories never went away.

MJ still lives in upstate New York with her husband. She’s a member of Romance Writers of America and Central New York Romance Writers. Music and cooking are two of her passions, and she enjoys baseball and college basketball, but she’s primarily focused on wine . . . and writing.

To connect with MJ, visit her on her website, Facebook, Twitter, and Goodreads

Confessions from the Editing Cave with Carol Pavliska

Welcome back to yet another installment of Confessions from the Editing Cave. Today in the confessional -- contemporary romance author, Carol Pavliska!




1. Tell us a bit about your background working with editor(s). Did you hire a freelance editor? Work with an editor at a publishing house? Work with an agent in the capacity of an editor? All of the above or some other combination?
The editor I worked with is at a publishing house. 

2. What was your overall relationship with your editor? Good? Bad? Indifferent?
What I needed in an editor was someone who knew what she was doing, would respond to emails and concerns in a timely manner, and would value my time as much as I valued hers. I definitely got those things with my editor. However, in addition to those few things I needed, there were a few things I wanted. I mean, I like to be petted and loved and complimented and endlessly fawned over as much as the next girl – as long as the next girl is a gaping black hole of neediness. It took a few (perfectly sane) e-mails for my editor to recognize that I was a delicate flower – like one of those ridiculous indoor orchids you get for Mother’s Day that requires a mister and non-chlorinated water for the three months it takes it to finally die. Once she learned how to pat me on the head and tell me my hair was pretty, we got along smashingly well.

3. What was the best edit you’ve ever received from your editor?
Honestly, I think when my editor goes to sleep every night she congratulates herself for having saved my hero from plaid pants. I still think plaid pants are sexy, but I have come to realize they might be an acquired taste that the masses are not quite ready for.

To Recap: Editorial Save of the Century—putting hot, sexy Julian in reasonable pants.

4. What was the worst edit you’ve ever received from your editor?
One time I put a hero in these fantastically awesome plaid pants and my editor insisted on removing them from his body and replacing them with boring pants in a solid color. Actually, I don’t think we even gave them a color. I think we just ended up calling them “pants.”

To Recap: Editorial Fail of the Century—removing hot, sexy Julian’s awesome plaid pants and not even for anything fun.

5. What was your first, initial, gut-reaction to your edits?
I’ve held friends’ hands while they opened editorial letters. And it was usually pretty awful. Logically, I knew that if I was ever lucky enough to receive an editorial letter of my own, it would probably be pretty awful. But I didn’t believe it. And that’s why I was surprised when it didn’t say, “Wow! This is perfect just as it is! Congrats!” 

Once the shock and awe wore off, I moved on to bitter devastation. I cried. I threatened to quit. Basically, I did all the usual things authors do when they receive their editorial letters only worse and with tequila. I’m absolutely amazed I have any friends left at all.

6. Confession time! Share anything else you’d like to confess.
The most valuable lesson I learned in working with my editor on Color Me Crazy is that most required edits are not as big as they seem. Often, a single sentence is all it takes. But you don’t realize that when you first read an editor’s comment. Everything looks gigantic – when in fact, much of it is very small. And nothing is personal. It just feels like it. 


ALL ABOUT CAROL:

Carol Pavliska began her writing career as a family humor columnist and blogger, a pursuit she abandoned when her children grew old enough to realize they were being exploited. To save them from further embarrassment, she turned to writing fiction. Her debut novel is a steamy contemporary romance so, unfortunately, the children are still embarrassed.


Carol and her husband, both diehard Red Hot Chili Peppers fans, raise their vegan brood of mortified offspring on a cattle ranch in south Texas. No lie. 

To connect with Carol, visit her on FacebookTwitter, and Goodreads